Tag Archives: Thai culture

Small village, large wat compound

Wat Aranyapaisan is a beautiful monastery in a large, well-kept compound in the village of Ban Sroi, Amphur Phana, Amnat Charoen Province. There were nine monks in residence when I visited in late May 2017.

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Refurbishing a village Wat

Ban Toei is a small village in Muang Samsip District, Ubon Ratchathani Province. It is situated beside Road 2049 between Phana and Muang Samsip.

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The main gate is somewhat obscured by telephone and electricity lines

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but this side gate, shown here from the inside, is not:

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From the main road, the eye is caught first by this large seated Buddha image:

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A closer look is worthwhile:
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Work on the ubosot seems to be finished, on the outside, at least.

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As is usual, the detail is worth exploring.

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Before leaving, a tam boun donation seemed appropriate. While I was there a truck was delivering dark red soil to level the compound. There are only two monks and a young novice in residence at this monastery. But they certainly seem determined to improve the buildings here. I will re-visit when they complete the work.

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Buddha Images Outdoors

Buddha images on hillsides and atop mountains are a feature of driving through the Thai countryside, and it is always a pleasure to catch a glimpse of one from the window of a train.

They are seen more and more frequently, it seems to me, in wat compounds and by the roadside. Here are a few I have seen and photographed recently.

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The next one is at Wat Khuha Sawan, Khong Chiam, Ubon Ratchathani Province:

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Wat Muang Sawat

Wat Muang Sawat (or Wat Ban Muang Sawat) is situated in Tambon Phana, Phana District, Amnat Charoen Province. It has three gates and this one is probably the ‘main gate’ even if most people might enter through another one.

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This gate has two features which make it attractive. There are no electrical or telephone wires on this side of the road; and there are 3-D ‘teaching’ pictures moulded onto the walls adjoning the gatway. These may be particularly appropriate because on the other side of the road is Ban Muang Sawat (Primary ) School.

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The sequence of childhood, old age, sickness and death is illustrated:

And there are somewhat grim warnings of the evils of adultery, gambling, and drunkenness:

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We can also see a monk teaching against theft, drunkenness and adultery:

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And we are also shown positive images of ‘good’ behaviour:

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